Interviews

Interviews 2015

SOUNDTRACK OF OUR LIVES: WAYNE HUSSEY

SOUNDTRACK OF OUR LIVES: WAYNE HUSSEY

backseatmafia.com – 12.06.2015

Interviews 2011

Q & A with Carlo @ bodystyler / electrozine.net

Q & A with Carlo @ bodystyler / electrozine.net
by Torsten Pape – 09/2011 (ger.)

Q & A with Carlo, Pete & Ralf

March & April 2011 – english/german – uncensored 😉
By Petra Suemnicht

Mixing and mastering of the new album STRANGER (?) is finished now. How does it feel to have the whole thing finished and ready to go? What kind of album can we expect and what can you tell us about the songs?
Ralf: puhh, hat fast 2jahre gedauert und jetzt ist das ding fertig. als musiker und producer kann man ja sich nie damit abfinden, dass die songs in ihrer entwicklung abgeschlossen sind, quazi fixiert. es sind sehr unterschiedliche songs drauf, wieder mit vielen gästen – alles kleine planeten mit ihrem spezifischen eigenleben 😉 – einige songs hinterlassen eine offenheit und auch ein grosses fragezeichen – “stranger”: konkrete pop-songs & ballads im beatles-schema stehen neben eher offenen jams mit experimenteller, untypischer struktur. der deadguitars-horizont ist offener geworden und man kann die einflüsse unserer parallel projekte und ex-bands wiedererkennen (wrt, belgium, convent, 12DD…). man hört mal echte geigen oder elektro-einflüsse. das ist sicher musikalisch anders als bei den vorgänger-alben “airplanes & flags”. auch wurden die verschiedensten produktions- & recording-techniken benutzt. gitarren wurden z.b. nachts im garten, im aufzug oder am strand an der cote d’azur aufgenommen. drums im treppenhaus, carlo’s vocals teilweise im auto oder in seinem schlafzimmer in utrecht eingesungen. parallel wurde auch einiges programmiert oder unsere gastmusiker haben ihre files zugeschickt. wie Michael Dempsey (ex-the cure), der in seinem studio in LA diverse instrumente aufgenommen hat oder I.V.Webb‘s vocals in london. Axel Ruhland (M.Walking) hat sein string-arrangement in hamburg aufgenommen…
Carlo: Stranger is the title, yes indeed, stranger 😉 It’s a multi coloured album with a lot of different songs and mixes. I have listened to it several times now and I really can’t say where this one will lead us to. Love goddess & the love ghost is the starting track and it really blew my head off! I really love it! When we recorded it I wasn’t sure, it never really got a hold on me somehow, but after the final mixes have been done it really has a drive. I really think this is going to be a mile stone back in time and further into the future. Hope our fans will understand it as much as I do now.
Pete: it’s a great relief to have it all wrapped up…as it took longer than we had originally anticipated… time to let go and prepare for the exciting things to come…

I know that many people would love to hear it as soon as possible, so is there an approximate release date?
Ralf: irgendwann mitte 2011
Carlo: I hope in a time when there is a good promotion built around it. Not before that. I don’t want us as a band throwing pearls for the swine. I mean to say, it would be a pity to see this album sunken into the endless sea of releases. An album that we all worked so hard on. It’s worth being noticed!
Pete: well… this time around we’ll be releasing a single up front which could happen within the next 10 weeks or so… the album should be out in august this year… it’s now up to our new label to decide things like that.

When did you start writing and creating the songs for the new album?
Ralf: die ersten tracks wurden schon juni 2009 aufgenommen. “you and I” basiert sogar auf einer noch älteren song-idee die 2007 von carlo und mir im wohnzimmer demo-mässig eingespielt wurde… die original gitarren-loops hört man noch auf der CD. ich finde es authentisch wenn man die ursprünglichen ideen mit in die produktion einbaut, also die original jams ;-), das macht es eigenartig und ‘”special”.
Carlo: We always write new tracks and ideas whenever we meet, as Ralf already said, we began to record You & I already in 2007, but we never finished it, the lyrics for the song I rewrote lately.

Are there any themes running through the album do you think?
Carlo: Well, I always try to combine the lyrics with the red line of the title, I mainly do that before I finish the lyrics. I’ve got a title in my head and rearrange the lyrics around it. That doesn’t mean that it’s always a concept album. I just try to give it a sense of meaning. To make it cinematic like. This time lyric wise I am the stranger again. The stranger that I felt in many different life situations. Things that happened around me I could not identify myself, or neither be a part of. I had the feeling I was just an observer and not involved.

What is your personal highlight from the new album and why?
Ralf:along the great devide“. es basiert musikalisch auf einer song-idee, die ich für meinen sohn (6) entwickelt hatte. es verarbeitet die trennung von seiner besten kindergarten-freundin. ein sehr trauriges thema, aber es ist toll, dass es den weg auf’s album gefunden hat. nett, wie metaphorisch carlo das thema bearbeitet hat. aber eigentlich sind alle songs highlights 😉
Carlo: It’s hard to say really after having this one now for just more than a week. As I said before I love the track “Love Goddess & the love ghost” because it has such a catchy bass-line, an eighties touch transferred into the now and such an energy. But I also love the cover of the Neil Diamond song called “The Singer” because it has such a fragility and purity. Other favorites are “3 words for the lovers” and “You & I”. I was surprised what Ralf did with the title song “Stranger”” a nearly instrumental track, really a mind blowing piece of art. “Along the great devide” could be a track by the mission or the sisters, a wonderful produced dark track.
Pete: i go through phases whereby my personal favorites have differed along the way… for the last few weeks it’s been “Love Goddess…”. Before that it was “chromelike splinters”… next week, who knows? why? I can’t really pin-point it… it just happens…

6.) Do you have any particular hopes or expectations for the album?
Ralf: natürlich, das es jemandem gefällt
Carlo: May those who listen filter the essence out of this album and enjoy it as much as we did while we recorded it. Always keep in mind that it’s not comparable to the music done by bands who spend a fortune on production costs. In that case we are limited, but to be honest with you, it sounds like a major production!
Pete: it would feel good if our fans enjoy this album… if we manage to reach out to new people and strangers with it…even better…

Any plans to put up an album teaser on YouTube for example?
Ralf: yes
Carlo: great! :-)
Pete: we do have a few videos planned for some of the tracks…it’s all being worked on as we speak…

There are several guests across the album, did you have preconceived ideas about what you wanted from them or was it a more organic process than that?
Ralf: teils teils. bei crystin’s & I.V’s vocal-parts war klar was wir wollten. auch bei den streichern gab es eine vorgabe, die aber natürlich unsere gäste mit ihrem typischen style ausfüllen konnten. michael dempsey hat seiner kreativität freien lauf gelassen. geil, dass mein alter kumpel colin drummond (12DD) mit einem violin-overdub in einem song zu hören ist. thomas kessler’s piano-part ist magic. man kann vielleicht nicht alle gäste optimal featuren und so ist das piano von meinem alten freund georg sehrbrock (belgium) in das tösende finale des schluss-songs gerutscht – ironie des schicksals. ich habe den song und deren 120 aufnahme-spuren ab minute 5 vom “zufall mixen” lassen. ein experiment, nach dem motto: let’s see what happens.. 😉 …es war sehr schwer ihm das verständlich zu machen…
ps: ich möchte mich hiermit nochmals sehr herzlich bei allen gastmusikern bedanken.

Are there any further artists you would love to work with some day?
Carlo:
Who knows, we already have a good reputation by now and many people who liked to be part of what we produce and have produced already. I hope to get many more involved into our music because it’s so inspiring working with good people who give a different approach to what we create.
Pete: maybe the additional artists we had originally approached for this album who couldn`t get around to contributing for sheer lack of time (owing to their tight touring schedules etc.) will have enough time next time around. personally, I would love it if mister Wayne Hussey were aboard once again…

If you compare the new album to the previous ones, in which points do the albums differ from each other?
Carlo: It’s the same style in different colours, fans will notify our signature, vocal melodies, and instrumental parts. It’s just created in other circumstances, in a different “Zeitgeist”, with different guest musicians and a different approach. It is a stranger to the ones before and it is stranger than the ones before, but you will find the same handwriting and emotion.
Pete: this is more on a technical note, but the first album “Airplanes” was produced in various studio situations on analogue tape with the full band laying down the backing tracks. the second album “Flags” was recorded mainly in our own “deadrose” studio on 24 track hard disc. This time around we recorded on Ralf’s note book, all over the place, wherever we were at the time with no limit to number of tracks.
“Stranger” differs to the previous albums in that it was soley recorded, produced and mixed by ralf. he had our unconditional trust to do whatever he wanted to do with the tracks. Which he did, in every respect. In my eyes he’s crafted a grand album over the last 2 years, spending every spare moment of his time on this labour of love

Are there any plans to tour the album?
Ralf: yes. we’re starting a tour in october2011
Carlo: We will as soon as we know more, we’ll let you know.
Pete: we are hoping to perform a few festivals during summer, maybe a short acoustic tour in august and a full band tour in October and anything that pops up in between. Maybe…and if time allows a few gigs in the UK…about time we got over there to see our friends again…

Is there any place in this world you would love to have a gig some day where you have never been before?
Ralf: Tokyo! also I’ve never toured Scandinavia, would love to go there one day…
Carlo: Greece, Scandinavia, USA, Asia!
Pete: Mexico / Tibet

How would you introduce Dead Guitars to someone who doesn`t know you?
Ralf: listen to “name of the sea” on cd, watch crash-video @ LMH2008! listen to carlo’s voice. come to our gigs & buy the album!
Carlo: Music for those who love music by Bowie, The Cure, Pink Floyd, The Editors, Radiohead, The Mission, The Chameleons, The Sound, Echo & the Bunnymen, Joy Division and that kind of stuff…give it a chance! :-)

What is your intent and philosophy for 2011?
Ralf: abschalten!
Carlo: Save our wonderful planet and be more tolerant. I need a break soon anyway 😉
Pete: intent: to go and have my ears tested…
philosophy: power to the people / worldwide shut down of nuclear plants with large investments in alternative energy / gangster politicians, bankers, warmongers etc. to be locked away for life…you know who you are…

Carlo, Pete & Ralf, thank you very much for your time!

Interviews 2009

Interview Ascension Magazine

ascensionmag21deadguitars47sm

Interview in Italian (original publication)

ascensionmag21deadguitars46sm

Interview in Italian (original publication)

Interview by Alex Daniele
Published with kind permission of Ascension Magazine

The Convent, White Rose Transmission, Twelve Drummers Drumming… Dead Guitars looks like a united force of different musicians and long-time rockers and wavers… This is the first time we host you in our pages and (probably) this is the first time you talk to an Italian magazine… If you don’t mind, it would be nice to introduce your new band telling us the reasons Dead Guitars formed…
Ralf: yeah. We had our experiences in our former bands. But we wanted to create something new when pete & carlo first met, just song writing with acoustic guitars. Dead guitars later developed to a more live line up.
Pete: It’s a pleasure for us to be interviewed by an Italian magazine for a change, thank you for your interest in the Dee Gees. We have fond memories of performing through Italy in February 2008 during The Mission tour, although the winter temperatures were sometimes freezing (especially in Rimini) we were welcomed most warmly by the crowds and we’ve made quite a few new friends there on the way. Hopefully we’ll be returning for a few gigs one day.
As Ralf mentioned we had started as an acoustic set-up… but to be honest I for one was quite worried to be playing the club circuits on an unplugged basis being a “new” band…like how do you keep the attention span of a crowd going for an hour or so with very delicate songs whereby you could hear a pin drop? So we decided to move toward a full band situation and be as loud or quiet as we want ; ) I really don’t regret that decision because out of that came a much bigger thing and I just really enjoy being engulfed by of a wall of sound. Having said that I really have a lot of respect for musicians who go on an acoustic tour because it’s so intimate and much more work…maybe one day…
Carlo: Hi ya, I love Italy…the country of good football, wonderful girls and the best food and my girlfriend says the best looking boys come from Italy 😉 No seriously, in the past I have been interviewed by several Italian magazines, but that was with The Convent & White Rose Transmission. Must have been 100 years ago 😉 The reason why Dead Guitars formed? Because sometimes during a lifetime you will meet people you have to meet, sooner or later. This was the right moment for a new love. The love for the music that we share together. We all couldn`t avoid it; we walked straight into the light of something that we never saw before. We met, rehearsed and fell in love with each other. I guess that’s what you hear in the music and what you see on stage. A band of brothers in love with the same music.

02. The music featured on “Flags” is even darker than your debut album…It’s something very melancholic, dark, desolated, something we cannot label “goth”, “pop” or “darkwave” but, for sure, a very deep expression of dark feelings and emotions. Would you like to tell us what do you want to transmit with the music you wrote for “Flags”?
Ralf:
production wise there are different approaches on every “FLAGS”-song. A mix of real song writing, jamming in the studio! Experimental stuff, material we recorded outside in the garden… inspiration from all directions with different flags. Even world music, ambient or just: “rock”…
Carlo: Well, it all came together as a flash, what I want to say is that life goes up and down sometimes. I’m not some sad soul who’s lost in the darkness, I’m melancholic, I write during the fall & the winter and in the summer I won’t write, I just lay in the sun :-). When we composed Flags it was fall & winter. I wrote most of the lyrics because I was so inspired by the music that the band created, some of the tracks were written while leaves were falling from the trees, the right mood to be moody :-) I’ve always been mellow as long as I can remember, but I’m not depressed. A lot of people mix that up. Melancholy has a desire, a sunbeam behind the grey clouds. If you really let our music in, you will feel that too. There’s hope at the end of the dark, long tunnel, raise the flags and celebrate life and love! :-)

What is the metaphor behind the title? Which “flags” do you mean?
Ralf:
one day I said to Rich Vernon (bass player of The Mission) that we should rather name it: “friends” :-) … dead guitars members live in Russia, the Netherlands & Germany. Also we had guest performances on “FLAGS” recorded in Brazil, Wales, Russia, Germany & the US. Most of the material got deeply inspired during our European-tour in 2008. but the main thing is that (our) music is a medium, a trip, a road movie of our lives & a map of our lifelines.
Carlo: Flags is a symbol for your nationality. After spending so many years in other countries I’m back in my home country the Netherlands. A lot of flags during the queen’s birthday though! J No, but we all want to be one big family in Europe, so we can support each other, but on the other hand we all want to be different and individual too. That was one part! The other coincidence was that while I wrote the lyrics I recognized that I often speak about phrases like “raise the flags” or red, white, blue (in Blue) – afterwards I realized that these are the colours of the Dutch flag too … That was reason number two…and the last reason for Flags is because it’s significant for all the nationalities in our band. Scotland, Germany, Russia and Holland. Me? I’m an internationalist!! :-)
Sven-Olaf: Since I joined Dead Guitars as a bass player together with Patrick our drummer 2 years ago, I travel between Russia and Germany to join the band for studio and concerts. Living in two countries gives me a clear idea what means different nations and “flags” – somehow I now realized the advantages of living in Europe… For me, the metaphor “raise your flags” is not connected with any nations, I thought it is an invitation to show yourself – to express your feelings and show the colours of your soul to the outside world – “raise your flag!” But maybe it is just my wrong interpretation of Carlos poetic words…

04. In 2008 you toured with The Mission during their European “Farewell Tour” and… And I see you have now become friends with them in a way that Wayne, Mark and Rich contributed to some songs on your second album… Can you tell us how the things developed? And how did you originally get the job to support The Mission in Europe?
Ralf: pete & I first met Wayne Hussey during our studio-time in London with 12DD in 1990. we had some hotel bar-parties & at that time there was a slight chance to join the mish when Simon Hinkler left the band. Wayne heard our debut album “airplanes” & loved it…
Pete: When I found out that The Mish were doing their final tour I immediately contacted them and asked if they were looking for a band to support them on it. In a matter of days we had signed the contract. We just thought that it would really fit nicely together and it did. It was great seeing them perform with a different set every night. Respect…they had rehearsed about 64 songs which they played off the cuff during the tour. It’s inevitable that during 20 gigs together The Mish & The Dee Gees got to know each other, had beers, laughs, shared compliments & phone numbers and in that way became a bit closer to one another.
Carlo: I met Wayne on tour, we were both busy performing and I am a drama queen on tour, a pain in the arse, a selfish egocentric bastard. Wayne is also quiet isolated on tour because he sleeps badly on the coach. He takes his sleeping tablets to get through. We didn’t have much contact at the start, later we got closer, but then the tour was at the end. I remember Wayne watching our sound check once and he told me that he loved our songs. That really was good to hear from Wayne, not saying many words at all… After the tour we got in contact again and when I asked him if he would like to do a duet on Isolation he replied…”I thought you’d never ask” :-) We met again in Germany and became quite close friends. I really liked the band, Mark, Rich and I went to the Coliseum in Roma, we had a great time, they always supported & encouraged us and it was as if we had known each other for ages.

Were The Mission some of your idols? Other artists influenced your approach to music?
Ralf:
maybe in the ‘80s? I definitely was into The Sisters & I’ve seen Sisterhood live in ‘86 supporting The Cult & had all Mish-lps up till “carved in sand”.
Carlo: I had seen The Sisters of Mercy in 1984 in Hamburg and later Wayne formed the mission in 1986…I guess…I saw them with The Rose of Avalange in Hamburg . I really liked the first few albums, but no I’d never been a real fan but I liked them a lot. I lost the connection after Mask. I really liked them on our tour together! There are many bands I have been inspired by like Joy Division, Kraftwerk, The Doors, Tim Buckley, The Sound, The Chameleons and many more to mention.

Not for the fact that Wayne Hussey is singing with you but, in my opinion, I feel “Isolation” is like the manifesto of the album. I remember the first time I heard it live in Milan and I was impressed by the emotions transmitted by the song. Do you agree with my opinion ? What’s your mood the day you started to compose this song ? Which other songs from “Flags” you think can be pick up as your essence / manifesto ?
Ralf: thank you. There are some big trax on FLAGS like: “silver cross river”, “isolation”, “goodbye” & specially for me “blue” which transports some deep emotions & memories. When we played “blue” live the first time I started to cry. Yeah, I always have to cry at a certain part. “watercolours” started when I was fiddling around with my son & it’s funny that this tune made it on the album…“raise your flags” is the essence…our families & friends are singing on that one & that’s the core…
Pete: Isolation is also one of my favourites. It started off as quite a rocky event whilst composing the instrumentals. In fact when we played the live version in Milan you may remember that after the quiet baladesque first half of the song it morphs into an up tempo rock version right through till the end. Once we’d recorded the ballad part in the studio we thought we could always add the rocky bit at the end at a later stage… but never really got around to doing that… mainly because after Carlo’s and Wayne’s vocals were recorded it just felt so right as the ballad it had become to be.
Carlo: I just love to hear Wayne ’s voice on that track, I can’t imagine a better duet for this track or someone else on it! I also love the fact that Wayne sings so passionately as if it was his song. It’s a fantastic combination. If I listen to it in my car I have a smile on my face and it really touches me time after time.

As I said the mood of “Flags” is very melancholic and dark but – surprise – you opened it with a very rocky track touching the wall of sound… Why? Did you want to shake the listener at the first bite?
Ralf: …maybe…? I think “Pristine” is the perfect album-opener. Most of the other trax are good final songs :-)
Sven-Olaf: Yes, it’s a good song to kick off the album, to shake the listener and maybe raise some attention – but for me also songs like “Slow down” or “Wild Life” rocks. Also during our concerts we try to create a dramaturgy – to move from up tempo songs to melancholy and moody pieces, back to rocking tracks 😉
Carlo: I’m not good in choosing track lists. It’s good to let the band do that…but yes I guess it’s the best track to start with.

Carlo, in your musical career you had the chance to work with three artists (actually three of my personal musical heroes) like Adrian Borland, Mark Burgess and now Wayne Hussey… Would you like to tell me how it was to work with them and the main differences you saw in these three musicians / persons?
Carlo: Well, it all came together as well. I interviewed Mark in London for a small magazine, we became friends soon after. A year later we were travelling through Scotland by campervan. Later a friend of mine told Mark that I’m also into music, a year later he produced the first The Convent album. It’s great to work with Mark, he’s like my older brother, we’ve got a lot in common and we like each other’s music as well. Mark is one of my favourite singers of all times as well.
Adrian I met via the phone, when I asked for permission to cover “winning” of his band The Sound for a cover album. A year later Adrian supported The Convent on Tour. We made the first two White Rose Transmission albums together. Adrian also was one of my heroes as well. We became very close friends. And that still remains somehow…eternal.

I saw you are promoting the new album with some German dates. How is the tour going? Did you get some offer to play your music live out of your country? Or is there any chance to see you playing at some summer festival like M’Era Luna or Amphi Festival?
Pete: The live shows up to now have been really great and we’ll be off to the Netherlands next with a couple more shows in Germany after that. As I said earlier we’d really love to come over to Italy when and if we have a release there. There is talk about doing some shows in the UK as Flags has been released there since January, it’s being worked on as we speak.
Carlo: It’s hard to play on the festivals for a band like us. No major record deal, no financial support, few gigs! We would love to do more, off course, but who knows maybe one day a nice tour in your wonderful country! I love Italy and the crowd was great there…..

09. I thank you for the interview and I hope to see you soon in concert. To end the interview, traditional question, why don’t you tell us your plans for the future?
Sven-Olaf: For sure we now take care about our actual baby “Flags” and try to spread our message to the world outside – beside playing concerts and having interesting conversations with magazines and radios we try to build up our own mail order shop “www.schaffies-shop.de” to support the European distribution network of NEO / Sony music.
Ralf: we’ve already started to write new songs for the next album. Thx.
Carlo: We have to thank you for your interest and interesting questions. Future plans? I don’t know.. I will always write new lyrics and sing along to music that inspires me. I’m gonna raise some flags now and go downtown to meet some friends tonight :-) Love & respect

Interview Sonic Seducer

Uwe Marx / März 2009

Sonic: The Convent sind noch immer aktiv, trotzdem werden Dead Guitars oft als ihr Nachfolger wahrgenommen. Vielleicht wegen dem nahtlosen Übergang vom letzten Convent-Album zum Debüt von DG von 2007? Oder woran mag das liegen?
Carlo: The Convent sind eigentlich nicht mehr aktiv, sondern machen gerade noch zwei Konzerte, davor war seit 2002 nichts mehr, danach wahrscheinlich auch nichts mehr. Wir haben uns nur nicht aufgelöst, weil ich es schrecklich finde, das von vielen Bands diese Reunions immer nur dazu missbraucht werden, um die Leuten in die Läden zu locken. So haben wir die Freiheit, immer dann, wenn wir mal wieder Lust haben etwas zusammen zu machen. Dead Guitars begann in 2003, also unmittelbar nach der Convent-Pause. Man kann also ruhig von einem Nachfolger sprechen, obwohl Dead Guitars wieder etwas anderes ist, nur mit dem gleichen Sänger.
Ralf: Ehrlich gesagt, ich war in den 80ern & 90ern mit meinen alten Bands “Twelve Drummers Drumming” & “SUN” ständig auf Tour und habe da bestenfalls “The Convent”-Tourposter gesehen. Habe aber vor 10 Jahren mal Gitarrist Jojo in Hamburg kennengelernt. Sicher, Carlo prägt mit seiner Stimme das Gesicht einer Band. Ab den frühen 80ern Alben zu veröffentlichen & sich “den Arsch abzuspielen”, da kommt bei Dead Guitars einiges an gemeinsamen Erfahrungen zusammen. Wir schauen aber nicht zurück, ich hasse Revivals & Coverbands.. In erster Linie waren wir uns sympathisch und wollten 2003 was Neues aufbauen.

Sonic: White Rose Transmission existiert noch, The Convent auch. Fällt es da nicht schwer, diese bisweilen musikalisch ähnlichen Bands zu trennen? Gerade, wenn man nicht so häufig zusammen probt und in großen Entfernungen auseinander wohnt.
Carlo: White Rose Transmission war für mich und für Adrian Borland ein Projekt, wo wir unsere “anderen musikalischen” Saiten aufziehen konnten. WRT gibt es immer nur dann, wenn wir es wollten, kein Druck von Plattenfirmen und Touragenturen. WRT war und ist ein kreatives Nebengleis, keine Hauptstrecke, deshalb glaube ich auch, dass es immer wieder erfrischend ist etwas Neues zu machen. Es gibt keine Erwartungen. Die neuen Bandmitglieder von WRT kommen aus Holland, daher ist das üben kein Problem für mich, da ich seit 2002 wieder in den Niederlanden wohne. Mit Convent habe ich seit 2002 nicht mehr geübt, daher auch kein Problem.. Gladbach und Utrecht sind 2 Stunden mit der Bahn, bis dahin habe ich wieder ein paar Texte geschrieben

Sonic: Wer hat eigentlich die Band gegründet? Wer ist noch heute die treibende Kraft, die alles zusammenhält?
Carlo:
Peter Brough und ich haben angefangen und Ralf Aussem war ziemlich schnell dabei, damals waren auch Kurt Schmidt und Peter Körfer an Bord. Nun sind Patrick Schmitz und Sven-Olaf Dirks dabei. Wir treiben wirklich gemeinsam das Kind voran. Jeder hat seine Aufgaben und die machen wir gemeinsam sehr gut!
Ralf: Ich bekam 2002 einen Anruf von Pete. Solle mir mal was anhören und direkt Instrumente mitbringen, Songs mit Carlo, Pete & Kurt (Basser von 12DD & SUN). Für mich war es eine Art Fortführung unserer gemeinsamen alten Band: “twelve drummers” – nur mit Carlo als Sänger. Nach der ersten Songwriting-Session war mir klar, dass ich dazu gehören möchte. Kurz danach ging es schon ins Studio um die ersten Songs aufzunehmen.
Sven-Olaf: Patrick und ich sind erst später als neue Rhythmus-Gruppe eingestiegen, vier Jahre nachdem Carlo und Pete das Projekt gestartet hatten.. Carlo ist die treibende Kraft als Poet / Sänger und wenn wir auf der Bühne stehen – der Organisator der alles zusammenhält ist aber Pete. Er macht die wichtigen Kontakte und hat auch mich und Patrick in die Band geholt. Musikalisch war Ralf beim neuen Album der treibende Motor. Er hat die meiste Zeit im Studio an den Songs und Sounds gearbeitet und als Produzent neue Einflusse in unseren Stil gebracht. Patrick macht außer Rhythmus auch den Apple-Operator bei Aufnahmen und viel Artwork und ich zunehmend Pressearbeit. Also eine gute Arbeitsteilung.

Sonic: Insbesondere durch 12 Drummers Drumming oder auch Bands wie SUN seid ihr schon in Berührung gekommen mit großen Budgets, tollen Studios, Ruhm, etc. im Musikbiz. Ist es da nicht eine große Umstellung, mit DG auf eher kleinen Bühnen zu stehen? Nicht mehr von Musik leben zu können?
Carlo: Ich glaube das nicht ein einziger von uns von der Musik leben konnte, obwohl wir alle in “großen” Bands gespielt haben, die bei Major Companies unter Vertrag waren. Ich habe ziemlich viele Freunde in verschiedenen Bands, die alle davon nicht leben können. The Sound, The Church, The Chameleons. Für einige Zeit vielleicht schon, aber eher schlecht als recht. Wir haben alle unser Leben neben der Band. Ich habe das immer so gewollt. Ich habe nie richtig den Durchbruch angestrebt. Ich mache Musik, wenn es sein soll auch gerne für ein paar Freunde um den runden Tisch. Der Entstehungsprozess von Musik hat mir immer Spaß gemacht, nicht das Klinkenputzen um einen Vertrag zu bekommen. Ich liebe kleine Bühnen, unser Publikum auch, das macht jedes Konzert zu einem Erlebnis.
Pete: Ja, da stimme ich mit Carlo überein. Kleine Bühnen haben einen besonderen Reiz. Man hört sich untereinander gut und dazu hat man noch so ein charmantes Wohnzimmergefühl. Der Kontakt zum Zuhörer/Zuschauer ist damit auch sehr viel persönlicher. Für mich sind es schon andere Umstände die eine große Umstellung bedeuten, wenn ich an die 90 er zurückdenke. Alleine die Tatsache dass wir damals 3 Monate in den besten englischen Tonstudios verbracht haben um ein Album aufzunehmen, und dabei auch noch dazu Geld verdient haben. Auch die Fotographen, Produzenten, Manager, Studios, Tontechniker, Hotels, Fluggesellschaften, Videoteams, Plattenfirmen, Verlage, Vertriebe, Booker, Sound & Lichtfirmen, Instrumentenverleih, Cateringservice, Dealer und Roadies haben alle mit verdient. Das ist in der heutigen Zeit und in der Situation in der wir stehen absolut undenkbar. Der Zirkus funktioniert zwar heute noch, jedoch nur noch wegen der unermüdlichen ehrenamtlichen Tätigkeiten unsere treuen Freunde, die uns immer wieder unter die Arme greifen. You know who you are!! Wir produzieren heute unsere Werke selber, mit der vorerwähnten Hilfe, viel Liebe, Zeit und Schweiß. Ich kann nicht sagen was besser ist, aber eine Umstellung aus meiner Sicht ist hier nicht zu leugnen.
Ralf: Es ist schon manchmal sehr erschreckend, wie kaputt die Musik-Industrie ist. Aber man hat diesen Virus: Songs zu schreiben, Gigs zu spielen, auf Tour zu gehen, ins Studio zu gehen… Es wird wohl nie aufhören – es ist mein Leben. Und man lernt immer noch, statt alles in Grund und Boden zu verfluchen.

Sonic: Ist Echozone eigentlich Euer eigenes Label? Ich könnte mir vorstellen, dass es ziemlich schwierig ist, heutzutage eine Band wie Euch, die nicht über ein “krasses” Image, spektakuläre Aussagen oder vom früheren Kultstatus zehrt zu vermarkten, oder? Eine Band, die einfach *nur* gute Gitarrenmusik macht, hat es da schwerer, oder?
Carlo: Nein, Echozone ist nicht unser Label, es ist ein Label von Leuten die verstehen worum es in der Musik geht. Einige haben Musik gemacht, oder machen immer noch selber Musik. Es geht darum das die Musiker und die Labelmanager zusammen am gleichen Strang ziehen. Jede neue CD ist ein gemeinsames Baby, damit ist auch jeder dafür verantwortlich. Viele Bands denken das wenn sie einen Vertrag in der Tasche haben, die Sorgen aufhören. Sie fangen damit erst an. Es muss getourt werden, es müssen Folgealben auf den Markt, Trends gefolgt werden und die Musik muss angepasst werden.

Sonic: Trotz der ganzen erfolgreichen anderen Bands an denen Eure Mitglieder beteiligt sind/waren, seid ihr noch relativ neu. Neue Band doch immer ein bisschen wieder von vorne anfangen, oder?
Carlo: Ja, neuer Name, neues Glück und damit auch wieder ein langer Weg, wenn man erfolgreich sein will. Weißt du, Erfolg lässt sich schwer messen, kann aber auch so einfach sein. Wenn ich zurückschaue auf mein musikalisches Leben, sehe ich soviele Farben, schöne bunt eingefärbten Flächen. Ich durfte mit so vielen meiner Helden und so vielen neuen Menschen arbeiten. Ich bin total erfüllt. Wenn ich dann sehe das U2 in alle Stadien der Welt spielen, müsste ich mich ja wieder ganz klein fühlen, oder? Tue ich aber nicht, ich schaue lieber zurück und halte fest an das, was ich getan habe, erfreue mich und schreibe leise weiter.
Ralf: Da gibt es auch leicht unterschiedliche Erwartungen in unserer Band. Viele alte Kontakte sind weggebrochen, Downloads, brennen… einige sind auf der Strecke geblieben. Ein paar Idealisten machen weiter…

Sonic: Bei DG ist auch eine gewisse Abneigung gegen aktuelle Strömungen des Musikbiz zu spüren… z.B. Myspace mögt Ihr nicht so, oder?! Trotzdem muss man wohl bei derartigen Geschichten heutzutage mitspielen. Ihr habt ja auch einen sehr aktiven Account bei myspace…
Carlo:
Nein, im Gegenteil…ich mag Myspace! Es ist zum ersten Mal wieder eine Möglichkeit, längst vergessene Bands wiederzufinden. Seine eigene Musik zu präsentieren und viele Freunde zu treffen. Ich bin kein alter nostalgischer Sack 😉 Ich liebe die Internet-Entwicklung sehr. Heute können auch neue, junge und frische Bands ihre Musik wieder zeigen und hören lassen. Das ist eine gute Entwicklung!

Sonic: Wie kommt eigentlich Euer Bandname zustande?
Carlo: Adrian Borland schrieb einen wunderschönen Song auf der letzten WRT cd die wir zusammen machten. Dead Guitars hieß der Song. Als wir lange überlegt hatten und die Hälfte der Bandnamen schon im Internet vertreten waren, die uns eingefallen waren, dachten wir, warum nicht Dead Guitars. Jim Morrison meinte irgendwann die Gitarren wären tot, Jimmy Hendrix war auch der Meinung und auch John Lennon hatte es mit dem Aussterben der Gitarren. Passender Name also.
Ralf: Habe den Song “dead guitars” gestern noch bei einer netten Situation gehört. Gigantisch gut & traurig zugleich. Ich war THE SOUND & CHAMELEONS–Fan der ersten Stunde. Danke Carlo.

Sonic: Wie seid ihr als relativ kleine Band eigentlich an den Job des Supports auf der Tour mit Mission gekommen?
Ralf:
Pete & ich waren 1990 mit 12DD in London im Studio. Wir waren ein halbes Jahr dort im Columbia Hotel, dort war auch THE MISSION untergebracht und man traf sich nachts immer in der Hotelbar…Party! Pete & ich wurden damals gefragt bei The Mish einzusteigen. Das war die Zeit der “Carved In Sand” – Production & Simon ist ausgestiegen. Weird, denn auf der Tour im letzten Jahr hab ich Simon dann kennengelernt. Was für ein Typ. OK, damals hatten wir einen Deal (wie The Mish, auch bei Phonogram) und Pete & ich konnten beide nicht bei The Mission einsteigen – shit happens… aber Wayne hat sich an uns erinnert & ihm gefiel das Airplanes Album sehr.

Sonic: Wie sieht es hier mit ein paar Tourgeschichten aus? Gab es Skandale im Backstage? Wart Ihr schließlich auch bei deren London Gigs vor Ort?
Carlo: It’s a gentleman agreement nicht über die Tour zu reden, genauso wenig wie über ein nächtliches Abenteuer 😉 Eine schöne Geschichte fand ich als The Mission Motorprobleme hatten in Spanien. Wir fuhren ziemlich dicht hinter deren Nightliner her, weil die Fahrer schon gesagt hatten, dass die Engländer Probleme hatten. Irgendwann frühmorgens standen die in der Mitte von Nirgendwo, Turbolader kaputt und viel Ölverlust, Motorschaden also. Die Mission’s hatten einen kurze Nacht hinter sich und sahen ziemlich schlecht aus. Wir haben dann unsere Kojen im Nightliner zur Verfügung gestellt und gesagt dass die mit unserem Bus mitfahren könnten. Wayne sagte, “great” legte sich in der Koje und schlief. Das war so witzig, wie der von einem Bus in den nächsten ging und sich pennen legte, so als ob nichts geschehen wäre.
Sven-Olaf: Die ganze Tour war wie eine riesen Party mit Freunden und wir haben den ersten Gig in London gemeinsam mit The Mish gespielt – tolle Kulisse im Shepherds Bush Empire, das alte Theater war bis in die oberen Ränge ausverkauft und Kamerateams haben alles für eine DVD Produktion aufgezeichnet. Richtige Skandale gab es eigentlich nicht, aber für das Konzert in Kroatien gab es schon richtig Stress – der Zoll wollte unsere Busse mit Instrumenten und Backline nicht durchlassen, da irgendwelche Papiere fehlten – Kroatien ist noch nicht EU-Binnenmarkt. Der Veranstalter musste The Mission im Privatauto rein schmuggeln und hat alle Verstärker und Instrumente schnell angemietet, damit das Konzert nicht platzt – scheiss Bürokratie.
Ralf: Die erste London-Show haben wir Support gemacht. Dort waren übrigends die meisten meiner Freunde im Publikum. Ich habe schon öfter London & England-Gigs gespielt. Es ist schon was besonderes & es war eine geile Location. Die ganze Tour war rock’n’roll. Echt der Hammer. Skandalös waren nur die kroatischen Grenzer, die uns nicht rein lassen wollten. Aber wir hatten eine gute Zeit & haben uns mit allen Mish-Leuten bestens verstanden. Haben jetzt noch guten Kontakt mit allen.

Sonic: Glaubt ihr, Wayne stoppt The Mish tatsächlich für immer? Oder gibt es da in 1-2 Jahren das große Comeback mit Best Off-Album und Touren + Festivals? Oder bin ich da etwas zynisch, was die Glaubwürdigkeit des Musikbiz betrifft?
Carlo: Wie ich schon vorhin sagte, ich bin total deiner Meinung. Ich war in 1979 das erste mal bei The Cure, danach noch ungefähr 10 Mal, weil es immer wieder hieß, sie würden sich auflösen. Ich glaube aber das Wayne erstmal genug hat vom Bandleben, nie aber von Musik. Er ist ein erstklassiger Sänger. Aber was weiß ich, vielleicht steigt er ja wieder bei The Sisters ein!

Sonic: Große Ähnlichkeiten zum typischen The Mission-Sound bestehen bei Euch zum Glück nicht. Der einzige Song, der ein bisschen an The Mish erinnert, ist “Pristine”. Warum wurde der Track direkt an den Anfang gesetzt?
Carlo: Ich war in den Achtzigern schon ein Fan von The Mission, aber verlor später mein Interesse total an dieser Band. Auf der Tour hat es mir aber wieder sehr gefallen! Pristine, The Mission? Weiß nicht, vielleicht mit einer dunklen Stimme schon.
Ralf: Dead Guitars Songs sind fast alle gute Schluss-Stücke. Einer muss den Opener machen. Ich finde eh, das da keine Ähnlichkeit zu The Mish besteht. Ich kenne jeden Mission-Song, aber Mark (Gitarrist von The Mission) bekam von mir nur die Ansage ein fettes Solo drauf zu spielen…go for it. Er hat so viele Projekte…man könnte auch schreiben: das klingt wie Peter Murphy, oder “wave”. Pristine erinnert doch wohl eher an Bob Dylan.

Sonic: Wo wir schon bei den Ähnlichkeiten sind… Bei Track 7, “Slowdown” erinnert das Gitarrenmelodie stark an “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” von den Stones. Ist das ein Zitat, oder geschah das unbewusst?
Carlo: Stimmt, fand ich auch – Deshalb fühle ich mich auch immer so alt bei der Nummer! Nein, war spontan, weiß nicht was sich die Band dabei gedacht hatte. Ich hatte diesen Text im Stau geschrieben und als ich die Nummer auf Band hörte habe ich das darauf gesungen. Irgendwie entwickeln wir uns alle wieder zurück, oder? Live mag ich die Nummer, sie hat etwas Positives und geht schön ab nach Vorne, durch die Mitte und unsere jungen Fans, kennen die überhaupt die Stones?
Pete: Der Gitarren Riff kam völlig unbewusst von mir… dachte ich, war dann sehr erschrocken als man mich später auf die Ähnlichkeit hinwies. Sorry Mr. Richards, I really didn`t intend to copy you. Da sollen die Stones uns verklagen. Wird Zeit dass wir bekannter werden.

Interviews 2007

Zillo Interview 2007

1. Als ich eure CD zum ersten Mal hörte, fiel mir schnell auf, dass ich schon lange nicht mehr (vielleicht seit Disintegration von The Cure) eine Platte voller so schöner, so emotionaler Lieder gehört habe. Gleichzeitig habe ich mich gefragt, weshalb heutzutage niemand mehr diese Art von Musik macht. Woran liegt das? Habt ihr eine Antwort?
Vielen Dank Stefan für die „bloodflowers“ 😉 Nein im Ernst – es ist schön, mit einer meiner favourite Bands der späten Siebziger verglichen zu werden. Ich habe noch Fotos, auf denen ich im Cure T-Shirt meine ersten Konzerte von ‘The Convent’ singe; ich war damals 24. Nun, einige Jahre später, neue Band, neue Eindrücke, aber die immer wiederkehrende, bleibende Melancholie. Nur diesmal mit dem Blick nach vorne, Licht am Ende des dunklen Tunnels, Kraft, Wolken brechen auf, es geht weiter. Das ist mein Gefühl mit dieser Band. Ralf und Peter treiben meine Texte musikalisch durch die Wände der eigenen, aufgebauten Mauern meiner Selbst. Die Musik hat Druck. Ich glaube, das war auch damals so bei Disintergration von ‘The Cure’ – melancholisch, aber mit dem Gefühl der Kraft weiter zu gehen. Keine Resignation, keine Stagnation, statt dessen Auftrieb. Daher ist der Vergleich vielleicht gar nicht so weit her gegriffen. Wenn keiner mehr solche Musik macht, dann wird es höchste Zeit, oder?

2. Ihr seid alles erfahrene Musiker. Wie fühlt es sich an, wenn man nun noch einmal mit einem neuen Projekt an den Start geht? Kribbelt es noch genauso wie früher, wie beim ersten Mal?
Ja, es kribbelt immer noch! Ich habe mit Peter und Ralf zwei Menschen gefunden, bei denen ich mich verstanden fühle. Sie wissen genau den Nerv in mir zu treffen, der bei ihrer Musik anspringt. Damit werden Songs zu Gefühlsausbrüchen, sie bekommen etwas Magisches. Ich habe manchmal während des gesamten Konzerts Gänsehaut, obwohl ich vom Bühnenlicht schwitze. Ich glaube, ich würde aufhören, bevor ich aus anderen Gründen singen würde. When the thrill is over, please turn out the lights.

3. Gibt es für Dead Guitars so etwas wie Ziele, etwas, das ihr erreichen möchtet oder dient euch diese Band hauptsächlich dazu, Spaß an der Musik zu haben?
Ohne „Spaß“ an der Musik wäre sie nicht einmal passiert. Geld gab es nie im Überfluss, also fällt dieser Grund schnell weg. Erfolg gab es für jeden von uns, Ralf und Peter waren mit ’12 Drummers Drumming’ eine erfolgreiche Band, Ralf später noch mit ‘Sun’. Ich hatte und habe Erfolg mit ‘The Convent’ und ‘White Rose Transmission’. Aber wenn man Erfolg überhaupt messen kann, so würde ich sagen, dass wir viel Erfolg hatten, aber das geht nicht ohne den Spaß an der Musik. Für mich gab es nie die Frage, habe ich Spaß daran, sondern das Gefühl, ohne Musik zu machen habe ich keinen Spaß mehr.

4. Von der Gründung der Dead Guitars bis zum Erscheinen von Airplanes sind satte vier Jahre vergangen. Es gibt Bands, die in dieser Zeit vier Platten veröffentlichen. Wolltet oder konntet ihr nicht schneller mit den Arbeiten an der LP fertig werden?

Wir hatten nicht den Druck. Es sollte unser Debut werden, kein zusammengeschnitzeltes Werk, sondern eine CD mit einer großen Dichte; wir wollten zusammen ein Gefühl entwickeln ohne Deadlines. Wir hatten kein Label, keine Pläne, aber viele Konzerte. Mit Echozone fanden wir ein Lable, das mit der gleichen Leidenschaft seine Bands promotet, mit dem wir Musik machen. Mancher Wein braucht eben seine Zeit zum Reifen.

5. Auf Airplanes sind etliche Lieder mit einer Spieldauer von ca. sieben Minuten. Vor dem Hintergrund, dass Popsongs heutzutage oft in ein Drei-Minuten-Korsett gezwängt werden und hauptsächlich aus Wiederholungen bestehen, sprengt ihr mit diesen Stücken die Konventionen. Absichtlich?
Ich glaube, dass wir nicht auf die Länge der Songs achten müssen. Live kann es sein, dass wir 1,5 Stunden spielen und gerade mal 12 Songs hatten! Was wir haben, ist Zeit…nichts Flüchtiges mehr zu verkaufen…time, time, you have to make the most of your time (the Chameleons).

6. Große Platten schließen mit großartigen Liedern. The Great Escape ist für mich – obwohl nicht Titelsong – so etwas wie die Quintessenz des Albums. Könnt ihr vielleicht ein paar Worte zum Inhalt des Stücks verlieren?
Es waren für mich textlich gesehen wahnsinnig produktive Jahre, ein Leben auf dem Kopf. Tod oder Leben, aufgeben oder kämpfen, verlassen oder bleiben. Welche Richtung du auch wählst, du wählst sie selbst, mit oder ohne die Schuld der „Anderen“. In diesem Song geht es um Verlassen und den immer bleibenden Schmerz deswegen, wann immer du zurückschaust. Ich habe lange überlegt, ob der Song am Ende des Albums stehen sollte, vielleicht sollte man so nicht enden – mit Schmerz. Aber dann dachte ich, doch…“and so I walked away in silence“

7. Was sind die Dead Guitars? Ein Projekt für eine Platte? Eine Band mit Zukunft?
Dead Guitars ist eine Band mit Zukunft; sie hat gerade angefangen in die Zukunft zu gehen, sich vorsichtig herantastend, mit dem Ziel eine Musik zu machen, die zeitlos ist und mit viel Gefühl. Wir wollen nicht in die Charts, sondern in den Himmel kommen 😉 wenn das dennoch über den Weg in den Charts passieren soll, dann eben über die Charts. Ich denke nicht, dass ‘Radiohead’, ‘Talk Talk’ , oder ‘The Cure’ jemals erwartet hatten in den Charts zu kommen. Dieser Weg ist immer offen oder verschlossen und abhängig von so vielen Zufällen und Begegnungen. Wenn das aber das einzige Ziel wäre, kann man besser ein Jahreslos kaufen und weiter träumen. Wir sind hier, die Zukunft hat bereits begonnen! Gitarren sind tot? Es leben die Gitarren!

Orkus Interview 2007

Für eine Band mit solch einem musikalischen Hintergrund mutet es doch bestimmt seltsam an, mit „Airplanes“ ein Debut zu veröffentlichen. Wie fühlt es sich an, dieses „von Null beginnen“?
Es ist jedes Mal schön mit ein neues Album an den Start zu gehen wo man alle Erfahrungen in einer anderen Form unterbringen kann. Veröffentlicht man unter einer unseren früheren Bands und Projekten ein Album ist die Erwartungshaltung der Fans und auch der Presse immer ein wenig vorbelastet. Mann fängt wieder mit ein neues Werk an und wird auch so gesehen.

Mit einer Erfahrung und einem Status, wie ihr aufweist, kommt ihr bestimmt nicht drum herum, stets über eure Vergangenheit ausgefragt zu werden und mit eurer Vergangenheit verglichen zu werden. Nehmt ihr diesen Umstand gelassen hin?
Keine Zukunft, ohne eine Vergangenheit. Kein Neubeginn ohne Kreativität und Erfahrung aus den bereits geschehene Produktionen. Wir sind besonders glücklich mit dem was wir hatten, aber natürlich auch mit dem was wir hier geschaffen haben.

Ist es als Musiker mit einem neuen Album in der Hand nicht unglaublich frustrierend, ständig über Vergangenes gefragt zu werden?
Nein, im Gegenteil, es ist auch ein Teil von dir und deine persönliche Entwickelung. Du nimmst die ganze Entwickelung mit um es vielleicht alles anders einzufärben. Ich freue mich, wenn man sich an uns erinnert.

Und hier kommt sie, die Vergangenheit: Was ist es, dass euch nach all der Zeit, nach weit über 20 Jahren, weitermusizieren lässt? Woher nehmt ihr die Kraft, Songs zu schreiben? Was ist euer Motor?
Der Motor ist die niemals endende Kreativität der Einzelnen. Wir haben uns gefunden, irgendwo auf diesem Weg. Alles scheint auf einmal zu klappen. Die Plattenfirma, der Verlag, die Touragentur, die Promofirma und natürlich auch die Band. Alle arbeiten Hand in Hand. Es ist als ob diese Cd auf einmal alle Hürden durchbricht, wo wir sonst immer gegen gelaufen sind. Wir hatten die Musik, unsere Vision und durch den Anderen wurden unsere Wege geöffnet. Alles das, was in Leidenschaft gemacht würde, scheint auf einmal loszugehen.
Und auch daher nehmen wir unsere Kraft, das ist der Motor.

Wie hat sich die Zeit beim Komponieren und im Studio angefühlt?
Sehr intensiv. Wir hatten so viele Songs das wir auswählen mussten welche letztendlich auf das Album kommen sollten. Im Gegensatz zu den Bands wo ich vorhin war, hatten wir mehr Songs. Ich war immer wieder beeindruckt über die Gitarrenwände wenn ich singen sollte. Ich bekam Gänzehaut und wusste einfach das dies die Musik ist die ich machen wollte.

Wie habt ihr die Zeit seit dem letzten 12DD Album 1995 verbracht?
Alle haben in verschiedene Bands und an unterschiedliche Projekte gearbeitet. Ralf war bei Sun, Peter und ich haben angefangen einfache Songs zu schreiben in 2001, später habe wir Ralf gefragt uns zu helfen. Peter und ich finden den Sound den Ralf macht einfach fantastisch.
Ich habe an meinem White Rose Transmission Projekt gearbeitet mit Adrian Borland und Mark Burgess und später noch mit Marty Willson Piper von The Church einige Songs aufgenommen. Weiterhin habe ich noch 2 Alben mit The Convent gemacht. Als von einer Pause war nie die Rede.

Nach Twelve Drummers Drumming seid ihr nun also unter dem Banner Dead Guitars in den melancholischen Wave/Pop/Rock-Gefilden unterwegs. Woher rührt das Interesse an selbst verwendeten Instrumenten in den Projektnamen?
Es war ein Song den Adrian für die 700 miles of Desert von White Rose Transmission schrieb. Kurz nach seinem Freitod in 1999 fanden wir ein gefallen an den Namen, es war eine Ironie, ein Widerspruch. Adrian war immer ein wunderbarer Musiker und Gitarist gewesen. Wie viele vor Ihn hatten schon gerufen das die Gitarren tot sind? John Lennon, Jim Morrison, Jimmy Hendrix. Alles Künstler deren Musik nicht ohne den Gitarrensound leben konnte. Wir dachten, ok die Gitarren sind tot? hier kommen die Gitarren. Die Dead Guitars.

Metaphorisch gesprochen – und das mögen wir doch alle – gibt sich „Airplanes“ ausgiebigen Flügen durch samtene Pop-Wolken, melancholisch-düstere Regenwolken und der einen oder anderen rockigen Gewitterwolke hin. Wie haben Dead Guitars zu ihrer derzeitigen musikalischen Ausprägung gefunden?
Durch die unterschiedliche Prägungen unserer Vergangenheit. Ralf und Peter verstehen worüber ich singe. Sie verkörpern dieses in und mit ihrer Musik. Es kommt ganz einfach zusammen, wir können uns gegenseitig dermaßen begeistern, so als ob wir eine völlig neue Band sind und zum ersten Mal anfangen zu musizieren. Jedoch mit einem kleinen Unterschied: die Erfahrung. Es klinkt gleich frisch und neu, obgleich es nicht immer neu ist. Es entstehen unterschiedliche Färbungen und Prägungen, dadurch entsteht die Wechselwirkung der Emotionen in der Musik.

Inwiefern ist jene Gegenstand von Veränderung? Könnt ihr schon einschätzen, wie ihr euren Sound weiterentwickeln werdet?
Wir entwickeln immer wieder neue Sounds und Klänge. Ralf ist hier sehr wichtig und nicht wegzudenken. Während Peter und ich immer zurückschalten und die Songs einfach halten, basiert auf einer Akustikgitarre und meinem Gesang. Es liegen schon wieder die unterschiedlichsten Songs in unser kleines Kästchen. 😉

Was fühlt ihr, wenn ihr die heutige Musiklandschaft unter die Lupe nehmt? Wo seht ihr die gravierendsten Mängel? Wo gibt es noch Hoffnung?
Ich glaube das es heute mehr als je zuvor „Hoffnung“ für uns gibt. In der Vergangenen 20 Jahren dürfte man die „80er“ nicht einmal mehr erwähnen. Heute gibt es so viele verschiedene Bands die die „80er“ Vorväter wieder nennen dürfen in ihren Interviews. Die Mängel sind eigentlich nicht neu. Es wird solange auf einer Trend rumgehämmert das sie letztendlich den Geschmack wieder verlieren wird. Zumindest befürchte ich das. Uns gab es bereits in den achtziger Jahre, uns gibt es immer noch, nur in einer anderen Form.

Eine „Indie Pop“-Band, wie man Dead Guitars grob umschreiben könnte, hat es trotz augenscheinlich der Popmusik entlehnten Zutaten reichlich schwer, in der heutigen Castingmentalität Fuß zu fassen. Wie seht ihr das? Wo seht ihr eure Chancen?
Wir haben wirklich großes Glück das es sich bei uns mehr um eine zeitlose Variante handelt.
Ich will nicht behaupten das wir neu im Trend sind, aber wir haben doch einen Einfluss gehabt in den vergangenen Jahren, wovon wir jetzt immer noch profitieren. Unsere Chancen sind jetzt besser als je zuvor um vielleicht nicht durchzubrechen, aber wieder eine Rolle zu bekommen mit schöne und ehrliche Musik.

Der Titeltrack beinhaltet die Zeile „every airplane must come down“, eine durchaus frei zu interpretierende Aussage. Was steht für euch dahinter?
Es war eine Aussage mit dem Inhalt das Alles irgendwann einmal auch wieder runterkommt was einst sich traute abzuheben. Ähnlich wie „what goes up, must come down“ Ich liebe es halt selbst solche Sätze zu kreieren. Ich war es satt den Bush seine Reden zu hören, wo er den Glauben an Gott dazu benutzt die Welt in den Abgrund zu helfen. Ich habe in den Song mehrere Textfragmente eingebaut die sich bezogen auf mein Leben. Der Tod, der Abschied und die Tatsache das alles eine Entscheidung ist die du selbst nehmen kannst.

„This Was A Year“, „Sweet Revenge“ oder „Should I“ erscheinen zumindest vordergründig sehr persönlich und mit Dingen verknüpft, deren Ursprung in der Vergangenheit liegt. Ist dem so?
Mein Leben stand auf dem Kopf, ich hatte so viele Freunde verloren, abschied von ein vorheriges Leben, der Neuanfang in einer anderen Form. Ich zog alleine zurück in den Niederlanden, nachdem ich fast 20 Jahre in Deutschland gewohnt hatte und viele andere Veränderungen die oftmals auch mit Abschied zu tun hatten, waren die Nährung für diese Songs. Sweet revenge handelt von mir selbst, schauend in einem Spiegel und über die Tatsache das ich mir selbst fremd war. Ich hatte die Hoffnung in mich selbst irgendwie kurz verloren.

Inwiefern ist Komponieren für euch stets Abschließen mit oder Verarbeiten der Vergangenheit? Könnt ihr den Finger darauf legen, bei was genau sie hilft? Würdet ihr für Dead Guitars unterschreiben, dass ausgeprägter Melancholie oder Nachdenklichkeit häufig auch ein Hauch Zynismus oder Ironie innewohnt? Lässt sich das auf eure Texte beziehen?
Es war für mich als Texter immer eine Vergangenheitsbewältigung zu schreiben. Irgendwie mache ich immer einen Abschnitt, schaue zurück über die Schulter und mache eine Zusammenfassung, eine Bilanz. Diese findet sich wieder in den Songs. Peter und Ralf scheinen dieses absolut zu begreifen, ansonsten wäre die Musik nicht so unterstützend. Es ist vielleicht mein Gefühlsexibitionismus um dieses öffentlich auszutragen. Vielleicht ist es aber auch einfach, wenn ich den Finger auf die Wunde legen kann um zu verstehen warum alles einmal so gelaufen ist. Ausgesprochen heißt oft verarbeitet.

Dass ihr das Album „Airplanes“ getauft hat, mutet ein wenig unterverständlich an, da man den Titeltrack somit automatisch hervor stellt. Wolltet ihr dies erreichen? Seht ihr ihn als repräsentativ?
Ja, absolut! Airplanes ist ein schönes Bild, ein Bild von fliegen, von Mut, Stärke, Unbefangenheit und vertrauen für mich. Airplanes is ein atmosphärisches Album es schwebt über den die dunklen Wolken seiner selbst. Sie will höher und frei sein von Zeit und Raum. Frei von schweren Gedanken die Sonne und das Licht entgegen. Es ist ein Album das aus dieser Kraft entstanden ist. Deshalb Airplanes.

Häufig wird auf ähnlich geartete Bands der Terminus „Post-Rock“ angewendet. Was haltet ihr von dieser Bezeichnung? Wäre sie in irgendeiner Form legitim für Dead Guitars?
Jedes Kind braucht einen Namen, aber Post Punk waren die wegebbende Wellen der Punk Musik. Ich bin mit diese Musik aufgewachsen, habe Teile davon zu meinen eigenen gemacht, sie verarbeitet und gefiltert. Daraus entstand letztendlich die New Wave auch bei die meisten Bands damals. Gitarren Wave, Post Punk, New Romantic und vieles mehr. Die neunziger kamen wieder mit Grunge, Rock und was es sonst so alles gibt. Wenn man uns den Stempel geben möchte das unsere Musik in diese Schublade passt, warum auch nicht…sind wir Post-Rock 😉 Die Gitarren sind tot, es lebe die Gitarren, es lebe der Post-Rock! 😉

NEGAtief Interview 2007

Bitte erzählt doch erstmal über eure Entstehungsgeschichte; es scheint ein wenig, als hättet ihr euch aus den unterschiedlichsten Richtungen zusammengefunden. Wie kam es zur Gründung der Dead Guitars?
Die Entstehungsgeschichte ist eine sehr lange und vielleicht nimmt sie doch ein bisschen viel Platz weg hier. Nein ganz im ernst, es ist wie eine art Zusammenschwörung, so als ob wir uns gefunden haben. Soviele Zufälle gibt es gar nicht hinter einander. Peter Brough und ich trafen uns nachdem wir über einen Freund von Peter von einander gehört das wir uns gegeseitig sehr schätzen. Peter mochte The Convent, aber vor Allem White Rose Transmission, wo ich in beide Bands für den Gesang zuständig war und ich mochte 12 Drummers Drumming, wo Peter Gitarre spielte. Da lag es ziemlich nah mal etwas zusammen zu machen. Vier Wochen später hatten wir 12 neue Songstrukturen auf Tape und 4 Songs im Studio aufgenommen. Als später Ralf Aussem dazukam waren wir das perfekte trio. Wir hatten anfangs Startschwierigkeiten mit Schlagzeug und Bass und haben dann entschieden das wir die Songs zur Dritt zusammen schreiben und für Live Touren unsere Rhytmusgruppe dazuholen.

Wie seid ihr auf den Bandnamen gekommen?
Es war ein Song den Adrian Borland (ex The Sound) für die 700 miles of Desert von White Rose Transmission schrieb. Kurz nach seinem Freitod in 1999 fanden wir ein gefallen an den Namen, es war eine Ironie, ein Widerspruch. Adrian war immer ein wunderbarer Musiker und Gitarist gewesen. Wie viele vor Ihn hatten schon gerufen das die Gitarren tot sind? John Lennon, Jim Morrison, Jimmy Hendrix. Alles Künstler deren Musik nicht ohne den Gitarrensound leben konnte. Wir dachten, ok die Gitarren sind tot? hier kommen die Gitarren. Die Dead Guitars.

Was würdet ihr als die hauptsächlichen musikalischen Einflüsse und vielleicht auch Vorbilder für euren Sound bezeichnen?
Ich besitze 2700 Vinylplatten und nochmal die gleiche Zahl an Cd’s Es gibt keine richtigen Vorbilder, aber Bands die uns geformt und geprägt haben. Wir wollten nicht wie irgendwer klingen, sondern unsere Vergangenheit und jahrenlange Erfahrung dazu gebrauchen etwas zeitloses zu schaffen. Eine Musik die man vor 20 Jahren hätte hören können und auch noch in 20 Jahren erträglich ist. Das macht man halt ohne effekten, pur und ehrlich. Wir werden momentan durch die Presse mit bands wie Talk Talk, The Cure, Coldplay und Radiohead verglichen, Vergleiche mit denen wir alle echt leben können und darauf sind wir natürlich auch stolz, aber ich glaube wer genauer hinhört findet noch vieles mehr in der Musik, auch unvergleichbares, hör genau hin 😉

Wie fand das Songwriting für euer Debütalbum statt, wer hat was zur Platte beigesteuert, wie war der Ablauf?
Wie ich bereits sagte, es waren letzendlich Ralf, Peter und ich die Kern der Band sind, aber auch Kurt Schmidt (Bass) und Peter Körfer (Drums) habe dazu beigetragen das dieses Werk seine unglaubliche Vielseitigkeit bekommt. Wir machten den Grundriss, die Anderen färbten das gesammte Bild ein, mit ihre ganz eigenen Farben und Klänge. Wir haben uns vor allem Zeit gelassen und standen nicht unter den Leistungsdruck der Company. Wir haben ein Label die hinter der Cd steht und unsere kreativität nicht eingeschränkt hat. Es steuern soviele jetzt an dieser CD mit, ohne denen wären wir nirgens. Touragentur, Plattenlabel, Publisher und die Promofirma arbeiten Hand in Hand mit uns, so etwas habe ich bislang noch nicht erlebt.

Was steckt hinter dem Albumtitel „Airplanes“, wie steht er im Bezug zum Rest des Albums?
Es war eine Aussage mit dem Inhalt das Alles irgendwann einmal auch wieder runterkommt was einst sich traute abzuheben. Ähnlich wie „what goes up, must come down“ Ich liebe es halt selbst solche Sätze zu kreieren. Ich war es satt den Bush seine Reden zu hören, wo er den Glauben an Gott dazu benutzt die Welt in den Abgrund zu helfen. Ich habe in den Song mehrere Textfragmente eingebaut die sich bezogen auf mein Leben. Der Tod, der Abschied und die Tatsache das alles eine Entscheidung ist die du selbst nehmen kannst. Nur du alleine trägst die volle Verantwortung.

Hat „Airplanes“ ein durchgezogenes Konzept, oder sind alle Songs für sich alleine zu betrachten?
Es ist nicht unbeding ein Konzept Album, aber hat die Dichtheit davon. Ich war selbst so überrascht als ich die Titel zum ersten Mal hinter einander gehört habe in dieser Reienfolge.
Es klinkt wie ein Konzept und doch stehen alle Songs für sich. Wie eine Reise durch eine Welt voller Tiefen und Höhen mit am Ende immer das helle Licht vor den Augen.

Wie entstanden die Lyrics, und wovon sind sie inspiriert?

Als Songtexter bin ich inspiriert von all jener Dinge die etwas in mir bewegen. Ich habe so vieles erlebt das es eigentlich für 2 Leben reichen würde. Ich fühle mich oft wie zB. Vincent van Gogh, ich habe all seine Briefe gesesen. Mir geht es oft genauso, du siehst dinge und malst sie auf, schreibst etwas dazu. Eigentlich denke ich oft, wem interessiert das schon was du schreibst, vielleicht ist es nicht für das Jetzt, sondern für später. Ich kann aber nicht leben ohne die Momente auf zu schreiben um sie zu verarbeiten. Ich achte immer darauf das der Klang der Worter schön sind und so offen das sie durch ein jeder frei zu interpretieren sind auf seiner eigenen Weise. Was gibt es schöneres, wenn es jemand gibt der deine Songs zu seiner macht? Es ist der Tot, der Abschied, die Entdeckung, der Auftrieb, die innere Kraft zu Leben die sich in meine Texte spiegelt. Es gibt keine Message, ich sage mir selbst oft: „ Steh auf, sei stark und mach weiter“ Das war im Ganzen worüber ich geschrieben habe. Trau dich, einfach mal abzuheben. Nur die Toten Fische schwimmen mit den Strom.

Habt ihr einen Lieblingssong auf der CD?
Wir haben unsere Lieblingsong auf der Cd aufgenommen, wir hatten in 4 Jahre Arbeit Songmaterial für mindestens einer Doppel Cd. Dann haben wir angefangen ganz kritisch auszusuchen. Die Songs die auf Airplanes stehen sind unsere Lieblingsongs.

Habt ihr eine bestimmte Zielgruppe, ein bestimmtes Publikum für „Airplanes“ im Kopf, oder ist euch das egal?
Es gibt bei euch in Deutschland diesen schönen Satz: „der Knochen kommt niemals zum Hund“ Wir werden sehen wer unsere Zielgruppe wird, bei uns auf der Cd steht kein Mindestalter und auch keine Altersgrenze. Unsere Konzerte werden besucht von Franz Ferdinand, Interpol und Kaiser Chiefs Fans besucht die gerade mal 18 sind, aber genauso haben wir ein älteres Publikum die den alten Helden der Achziger immer noch vermissen. Es ist wie bei U2, oder Coldplay bunt gemischt.

Heute ist der Musikmarkt sehr von elektronischer Musik geprägt – glaubt ihr, das Gitarrenmusik vom Aussterben bedroht ist? Und wenn ja: was kann oder sollte man dagegen tun?
Ich glaube das es heute mehr als je zuvor „Hoffnung“ für uns gibt. In der Vergangenen 20 Jahren dürfte man die „80er“ nicht einmal mehr erwähnen. Heute gibt es so viele verschiedene Bands die die „80er“ Vorväter wieder nennen dürfen in ihren Interviews. Die Mängel sind eigentlich nicht neu. Es wird solange auf einer Trend rumgehämmert das sie letztendlich den Geschmack wieder verlieren wird. Zumindest befürchte ich das. Uns gab es bereits in den achtziger Jahre, uns gibt es immer noch, nur in einer anderen Form. Die Gitarren werden immer wieder neues Leben eingeblasen werden, immer dann, wenn es wieder einen Overkill an elektronischer Beats gibt.

Wie würdet ihr „Airplanes“ in drei Worten beschreiben?
Fliegen ist schöner 😉

Werdet ihr mit dem Material auch Live unterwegs sein? Und wenn ja, wie darf man sich eure Konzerte vorstellen?
Ja wir sind auf Tour und zwar in den folgenden Städte:
01.06.2007 D-Berlin, K17 (+ White Rose Transmission)
02.06.2007 D-Bremen, Tower (+ White Rose Transmission)
03.06.2007 D-Hamburg, Logo (+ White Rose Transmission)
09.06.2007 D-M’gladbach, Café Message,
10.06.2007 D-Köln, UndergroundD-Viersen,
29.07.2007 Eier mit Speck-Festival 2007

Wie es aussehen weiss ich nicht, wenn ich das wüsste würde ich sofort aufhören Musik zu machen. Ich weiss vorher nie wie, oder ob ich je wieder runterkommen werde von der Bühne, aber es werden viele schöne Gitarrensounds in den Gehörgänge eindringen

Wie kamt ihr auf die Idee zum Video für „Name of the Sea“, warum genau dieser Song, warum ein Video? Erzählt mal ein bisschen vom Dreh und über das Konzept für den Clip!
The Name of the sea ist eine Zeitreise zurück in der Zeit wo die Liebe seine Naivität noch hatte, wo man dachte das alles endlos weitergeht wie das Meer, der Horizont und der Himmel. Dann würde ich ein Künstler und habe mich selbst betrogen mit der niemals endende Sucht nach Liebe und Zuneigung. Ich habe mich daran betrunken und bin darin fast ertrunken. Ralf Maier hat das Video gedreht und wir fanden es einfach nur genial. Wieder jemanden gefunden der uns versteht.

Ein weiteres Phänomen, neben dem scheinbar unaufhaltsamen Vorrücken elektronischer Musik sind Casting-Bands. Wie steht ihr, als gestandene Musiker, zu Castingshows und deren Kandidaten?
Ein Jeder soll machen was er/sie will oder mochte. Zum Glück hat der Fernseher einen Knopf zum ausschalten. Hier bei uns in den Niederlanden werden viele Horrorkonzepte für das Fernsehen ausgedacht die zur verblödung der Menscheit beitragen. Aber wollen wir gerettet werden? Ich glaube nicht… it’s just entertainment sang Paul Weller mal, wie wahr, Unterhaltung, nicht mehr, nicht weniger. Ich würde mich nie anmelden bei einem Talentwettbewerb, nicht als ich 16 war und auch heute nicht. Wir hatten nie Flüchtiges zu verkaufen.

Was sind eure Ziele für Dead Guitars, wo seht ihr euch in fünf Jahren?
John Lennon würde erschossen als er die glücklichste Periode seines Lebens eingegangen war, meine Mutter starb bereits mit 41 als sie gerade wieder frisch verheiratet war. Ich habe mir nie gefragt was ich machen werde in 5 Jahre. Ich war mal KFZ mechaniker nebenbei, jetzt bin ich Teilzeitdozent an einem Gymnasium. Wenn Bush nicht bald seine Truppen zurückzieht aus Irak…. wer weiss schon was passieren wird. Weiterhin zeitlose Musik machen und kreieren und dann im Himmel kommen 😉

Habt ihr ein Motto, dem sich die ganze Band anschließen kann?
Die Gitarren sind tot?? Es lebe die Gitarren!!! 😉

Vielen Dank und viel Erfolg mit „Airplanes!“
Ich bedanke mich rechtherzlich für das Interesse und deiner Geduld bei meinem Selbstgespräch 😉
Ich hoffe wir sehen uns irgendwo auf einer der Konzerte.
Liebe Grüsse, Carlo

Pop Connection Interview 2007

Ihr habt bereits in Bands wie „The Convent“ oder „Twelve Drummers Drumming“ gespielt. Wie seid ihr drei überhaupt aufeinandergetroffen?
Peter Brough und ich trafen uns nachdem wir über einen Freund von Peter von einander gehört das wir uns gegeseitig sehr schätzen. Peter mochte The Convent, aber vor Allem White Rose Transmission, wo ich in beide Bands für den Gesang zuständig war und ich mochte 12 Drummers Drumming, wo Peter Gitarre spielte. Da lag es ziemlich nah mal etwas zusammen zu machen. Vier Wochen später hatten wir 12 neue Songstrukturen auf Tape und 4 Songs im Studio aufgenommen. Als später Ralf Aussem dazukam waren wir das perfekte trio. Wir hatten anfangs Startschwierigkeiten mit Schlagzeug und Bass und haben dann entschieden das wir die Songs zur Dritt zusammen schreiben und für Live Touren unsere Rhytmusgruppe dazuholen.

Du hast unter anderem mit Mark Burgess (The Chameleons) und Marty Wilson-Piper (The Church) zusammengearbeitet. Wie kam es zu diesen Kooperationen?
Es gibt, oder gab nicht viele Bands in den spät Achziger die den Post punk überlebt haben und etwas zu sagen hatten. Ein paar schafften es, wie damals die Simple Minds, U2 und the Cure, die anderen blieben im Untergrund ohne die aufmerksamkeit der Medien. Bis letzendlich ihre Fanschar so geschrumpft war das diese Bands nicht überleben konnten, weil die Säle immer kleiner würden indem sie spielten. Wir hatten grosses Glück mit The Convent und spielten in 1990 immer noch vor ausverkauften Säle in Deutschland. Selbst behielt ich immer die englische Szene im Auge, weil ich die sehr mochte. So lernte ich Adrian Borland von The Sound, Mark Burgess von The Chameleons, Chris Reed von den Lorry’s, Marty Willson Piper und Steve Kilbey von The Church kennen. Wir mochten uns, respektierten uns, gingen zusammen auf Tournee oder arbeiteten zusammen im Studio. Es ist die Liebe für die gleiche Musik die uns zusammengebracht hat denke ich. Aber daraus entstand mehr als eine Kollegialität.Wir sind jetzt einfach gut befreundet.

Würdest du sagen, dass der Sound der Dead Guitars viel von euren eigenen Einflüssen oder musikalischen Vorlieben widerspiegelt?
Ich würde lügen wenn ich nein sagen würde. Klar spiegeln sich Einflüsse von Anderen in unsere Musik wieder. Ansonsten müsste man taub geboren werden, ein Instrument lernen und auf einmal das Gehör wiederbekommen um anschliessend seine ganz „Eigene“ Musik zu komponieren. Morrissey liebt die Musik von Bowie, Bowie is Fan von Scott Walker, Scott Walker von Sandie Shaw undsoweiter. Irgendwie sind wir alle beeinflusst von Jemanden. Manche schreiben das „airplanes“ nach der Disintigration von The Cure klinkt, ein anderer schrieb das es die beste Cd nach der Ok Computer war und Talk Talk kam auch schon ein paar Mal vorbei. Wir können gut damit leben :-)

Dadurch, dass ihr drei alle schon lange im Musikbuisiness unterwegs seid und in diversen größeren Bands gespielt habt, bringt ihr alle einen gewissen Erfahrungsschatz mit in die Dead Guitars ein. Fühlt ihr euch trotz allem als Newcomer?
Es ist jedes Mal schön mit ein neues Album an den Start zu gehen wo man alle Erfahrungen in einer anderen Form unterbringen kann. Veröffentlicht man unter einer unseren früheren Bands und Projekten ein Album ist die Erwartungshaltung der Fans und auch der Presse immer ein wenig vorbelastet. Mann fängt wieder mit ein neues Werk an und wird auch so gesehen. Ralf und Peter verstehen worüber ich singe. Sie verkörpern dieses in und mit ihrer Musik. Es kommt ganz einfach zusammen, wir können uns gegenseitig dermaßen begeistern, so als ob wir eine völlig neue Band sind und zum ersten Mal anfangen zu musizieren. Jedoch mit einem kleinen Unterschied: die Erfahrung. Es klinkt gleich frisch und neu, obgleich es nicht immer neu ist. Es entstehen unterschiedliche Färbungen und Prägungen, dadurch entsteht die Wechselwirkung der Emotionen in der Musik.

Ihr habt euer Album „Airplanes“ zusammen mit Guido Lucas aufgenommen. Warum habt ihr euch für ihn als Produzenten entschieden, er ist ja sonst eher für unkonventionellere, härtere Sachen berühmt und berüchtigt?
Guido Lucas versteht einfach sein Handwerk, ich habe viel in Studio’s gearbeitet, wo wir auch klasse Produzenten hatten, aber mit den Dead Guitars wollten wir in ein Studio gehen welches weniger „Achziger“ orientiert war. Was Guido kann und macht ist Einzigartig. Er produziert vielleicht viele härtere Sachen wie zB. Blackmail, aber im Grunde spielt das keine Rolle um auch andere Musik zu verstehen. Guido liebt auch Nick Drake und viele andere Sachen. Ich würde ihn umschreiben als ein Purist, der es versteht das weniger oft mehr ist und wir sind damit um eine schöne Erfahrung reicher. Das Album hat damit gewonnen, vor allem das die Musik darauf nicht datiert klinkt, aber den Guido Lucas Zeitgeist trägt. 2-3 Songs würden von Rainer Assmann gemixt, er war auch verantwortlich für die erste 12DD Lp damals.

Wie lief die Zusammenarbeit? Seid ihr mit dem Endresultat des Albums zufrieden?
Airplanes ist ein schönes Bild, ein Bild von fliegen, von Mut, Stärke, Unbefangenheit und vertrauen für mich. Airplanes is ein atmosphärisches Album es schwebt über den die dunklen Wolken seiner selbst. Sie will höher und frei sein von Zeit und Raum. Frei von schweren Gedanken die Sonne und das Licht entgegen. Es ist ein Album das aus dieser Kraft entstanden ist. Melancholisch zu sein hat wenig mit depressiv zu sein zu tun. Es ist ein Emotionsüberfluss. Etwas wunderschönes kann so überwältigende Kraft haben das es einen zu Tränen rührt, da ist von Depressivität nicht die Rede. Für mich ist als Texter wichtig das ich michselbst sein kann, Peter Brough und Ralf Aussem verstehen diese Worte und setzen sie prächtig um in den wunderschöne Gitarrensounds.

Wenn man sich euer Album „Airplanes“ so anhört, dann fallen vor allem die breit angelegten Gitarren-Wände auf, in die der Gesang eingebettet ist. Würdest du sagen, dass das charakteristisch für euren Sound ist oder wie würdet ihr euren Sound definieren?
Die Gitarrenwände sind das Werk von Ralf, er ist in meine Augen ein Fenomeen. He’s a guitar and sound wizard! Ein Zauberer, wirklich! Die Gitarren sind tot??? Es lebe die Gitarren !! :-) Ja absolut charakteristisch für die tote Gitarren, danke Ralf!

Es gibt bereits einige Rezensionen zu „Airplanes“, in denen fehlende Abwechslung bemängelt wurde. Wie seht ihr das? Muss sich ein Album eurer Meinung nach von Track zu Track neu erfinden, um interessant zu bleiben?
Zum Glück hat ein jeder Mensch eine unterschiedliche Empfindung. Ich glaube nicht das es an Abwechslung mangelt, sondern dieses Album eine unheimliche Dichtheit besitzt, fast wie ein Konzept. Natürlich klinkt es dabei nach uns. Ich war damals begeistert vom ersten Talk Talk Album, weil für Jeden einen Song dabei war. Ich liebe aber auch The Colour of Spring, da hat man wieder das Gefühl jeder Song ist unterschiedlich aber aus dem gleichen Holz geschnitzt. Wir werden die Musik nicht analysieren, wir fühlen sie und nehmen sie auf. Vielleicht bin ich halt ein öder, alter Zynist, ein düster Poet mit Minderwertigkeitskomplexe 😉

Die Dead Guitars sind quasi ein internationales Trio. Wie beurteilt ihr euren Sound im Hinblick auf die unterschiedlichen Musikmärkte England, die Niederlande und Deutschland? Glaubt ihr, dass euer Stil in diesen drei Ländern unterschiedlich wahrgenommen wird?
Wir sind eine internationale Band. Ralf kommt aus Deutschland, Peter Brough aus Schottland und ich komme aus den Niederlanden. Wir sprechen aber alle die gleiche Sprache der Musik. Diese Sprache verbindet uns. Wir fühlen uns aber in Deutschland sehr wohl, die Deutschen sind meiner Meinung nach ein vielseitig orientiertes Publikum. Wir sind alle immer sehr erfolgreich gewesen. Ich wohne in der Nähe von Amsterdam und vermisse Deutschland manchmal sehr. Ich fühle mich wie ein heimatloser Europeër 😉 Wir haben aber eine gute Presse im Ausland. Die Engländer lieben die Musik, die Holländer sitzen nur an den Grachten, schauen auf die Windmühlen und tragen Holzschuhe, links das Käsehäppchen, rechts den Joint 😉 Nein auch hier mag man uns!

Plant ihr, „Airplanes“ auch international zu veröffentlichen?
Wir sind dabei, wir werden sehen, ihr werdet hören, oder auch nicht, who knows? Not me.. we’ll see! :-)

Ganz lieben Dank, dass du dir Zeit für dieses Interview genommen hast! J
Aber immer gerne !! Lg. Carlo

Nightshade Interview 2007

Die “Dead Guitars” bestehen bereits seit 2002, aber erst jetzt, im Jahre 2007, erscheint euer Debütalbum “Airplanes”. Warum habt ihr die Menschheit so lange auf euer erstes Werk warten lassen?
Wir hatten nicht den Druck. Es sollte unser Debut werden, kein zusammengeschnitzeltes Werk, sondern eine CD mit einer großen Dichte; wir wollten zusammen ein Gefühl entwickeln ohne Deadlines. Wir hatten kein Label, keine Pläne, aber viele Konzerte. Mit Echozone fanden wir ein Lable, das mit der gleichen Leidenschaft seine Bands promotet, mit dem wir Musik machen. Mancher Wein braucht eben seine Zeit zum Reifen.

In der heutigen Zeit ist es schwer, sich am Musikmarkt durchzusetzen. Nennt mir doch bitte drei Gründe, warum die “Dead Guitars” sich gegen Hip Hop und “Pop Idol”-Casting-Opfer ihren Platz sichern werden.
1e Grund
: Wir haben wirklich großes Glück das es sich bei uns mehr um eine zeitlose Variante von musizieren handelt. Ich will nicht behaupten das wir neu im Trend sind, aber wir haben doch einen Einfluss gehabt in den vergangenen Jahren, wovon wir jetzt immer noch profitieren. 2e Grund: Unsere Chancen sind jetzt besser als je zuvor um vielleicht nicht durchzubrechen, aber wieder eine Rolle zu bekommen mit schöne und ehrliche Musik mit viel Gefühl. 3e Grund: Wir haben uns nie beschäftigt was die Anderen machen und andere Musik nie als konkurenz betrachtet. Jeder macht wo er gut drin ist. Wir experimentieren immer noch. Es ist gerade dieser Grund der die Presse anscheinend an uns schätzt.

Wie ich auch in meinem Review geschieben habe, wird man bei euch nicht zugedröhnt, sondern die Musik scheint sich langsam und schleichend in einem zu manifestieren, und schafft eine Athmosphäre, die an Kerzenschein und Sonnenuntergänge erinnert. Wie wichtig ist es für die Menschen Ruhepole in der modernen Lärm- und Stressgesellschaft zu finden?
Es ist in erster Linie für uns wichtig gewesen um in unsere Musik einen Ruhpol zu finden, um Atmosphäre zu kreieren. Wir wollten ein dichtes und abwechselndreiches Album schaffen. Ich denke das es viele Menschen gibt die diese Ruhe auch spüren. Wenn das so ist haben wir unsere Zielgruppe erweitert 😉

Allgemein wirken eure Songs sehr melancholisch und schwermütig. Aber an gezielten Stellen kommt dennoch, wie mir scheint bewußt platziert, eine Hoffnungsstimmung auf. Wieviel davon spiegelt euere eigene Mentalität wieder, und wie bewußt achtet ihr auf die Stimmungselemente, die ihr in eueren Songs einsetzt?
Airplanes ist ein schönes Bild, ein Bild von fliegen, von Mut, Stärke, Unbefangenheit und vertrauen für mich. Airplanes is ein atmosphärisches Album es schwebt über den die dunklen Wolken seiner selbst. Sie will höher und frei sein von Zeit und Raum. Frei von schweren Gedanken die Sonne und das Licht entgegen. Es ist ein Album das aus dieser Kraft entstanden ist. Melancholisch zu sein hat wenig mit depressiv zu sein zu tun. Es ist ein Emotionsüberfluss. Etwas wunderschönes kann so überwältigende Kraft haben das es einen zu Tränen rührt, da ist von Depressivität nicht die Rede. Für mich ist als Texter wichtig das ich michselbst sein kann, Peter Brough und Ralf Aussem verstehen diese Worte und setzen sie prächtig um in den wunderschöne Gitarrensounds.

Europa wächst immer mehr zusammen, und auch sonst fallen die Grenzen in der Welt. Welchen Einfluss hat das auf euch, sowohl im Privatleben, als auch als Musiker?
Wir sind eine internationale Band. Ralf kommt aus Deutschland, Peter Brough aus Schottland und ich komme aus den Niederlanden. Wir sprechen aber alle die gleiche Sprache der Musik.
Diese Sprache verbindet uns. Wir fühlen uns aber in Deutschland sehr wohl, die Deutschen sind meiner Meinung nach ein vielseitig orientiertes Publikum. Wir sind alle immer sehr erfolgreich gewesen. Ich wohne in der Nähe von Amsterdam und vermisse Deutschland manchmal sehr. Ich fühle mich wie ein heimatloser Europeër 😉

Auf der anderen Seite gibt es Brennpunkte auf der Erde, wo Krieg und Terror einfach nicht abzuebben scheinen, oder Hungersnöte die Menschen seit Jahrzehnten plagen. Welche Möglichkeiten haben wir hier im Wohlstandseuropa, diese Missstände zu beseitigen? Und warum wird das nicht umgesetzt?
Ich habe gerade gestern eine Reportage gesehen mit Bono von U2, er hat einen grossen Einfluss auf Politiker, die Kirche und der Industrie. Er hat mit sehr viele Menschen um den runden Tisch gesessen und ein Teil der dritte Welt schulden ist bereits erlassen. Es bleibt viel zu tun. Ich habe nur beschränkt Einfluss. Ich erzähle meine Schüler viel über Politik und Filosofie. Mein Ziel ist es dabei sie immer beiden Seiten der Schneide vorzuhalten. Ich habe den Vorteil das sie mir gerne zuhören. Ich umschreibe in meine Texste die Ängste vor den grossen Mächte, wie zB in Airplanes, aber ich umschreibe das Gefühl der machtlosigkeit gegen das Unrecht. Ich war nie der dicke Zeigefinger Texter. Verbesser die Welt und fange bei dir selbst an ist eher meine Divise.

Wenn ich mir eueren Song “Crash” anhöre, stellt sich mir die Frage: Wie wichtig sind Menschen, die einem Halt geben, Geborgenheit schenken und in schweren Zeiten zur Seite stehen?
Es geht in den Text darum das ich mich allein gelassen gefühlt habe als sich Adrian Borland (the Sound) in London vor einem Zug geworfen hatte. Wir waren sehr eng befreundet. Ich durchlief drei Fasen nämlich: die Trauer, die Wut und danach die Vergebung. Zuerst hast du Selbstmitleid und das ist

Emskopp Interview 2007

Nein, die Gitarren sind nicht tot

Nicht einfach als eine – irgendeine – neue Band haben die „Dead Guitars“ ihr erstes Album „Airplanes“ herausgebracht. Musikalisch sind Pete Brough, Ralf Aussem und Carlo van Putten in jedem Fall schwerstens vorbelastet. Brough und Aussem spielten in den Achtzigern in der deutschen Kultband „Twelve Drummers Drumming“; Ralf Aussem komplettierte später das Line-up der Mönchengladbacher Grunger „Sun“. Carlo van Putten stand als Frontmann in den Reihen von „The Convent“ und spielte gemeinsam mit The-Sound-Chef Adrian Borland als „White Rose Transmission“. Die Musik der „Dead Guitars“ setzt nicht etwa einfach das Schaffen der einzelnen Musiker aus den Achtzigern fort. Vielmehr bewegen sich die Kompositionen in einem musikalischen Meta-Stadium. Das Ergebnis: „Airplanes“ spiegelt als außergewöhnliches Album die Charaktere der Akteure deutlich wider, ohne dabei seine Geschlossenheit einzubüßen. Die zehn Songs beweisen Tiefgang ‚extrem’: inhaltlich und musikalisch. Jetzt aber die „Dead Guitars“ im O-Ton:

Wie kam es zu den „Dead Guitars“, wo und wie haben sich eure Wege gekreuzt? Kanntet ihr euch von früher?
CARLO:
Wir kannten uns nicht persönlich aber musikalisch schon von früheren Zeiten. Peter Brough und ich trafen uns nachdem wir über einen gemeinsamen Freund von einander gehört haben das wir uns gegeseitig sehr schätzen. Peter mochte The Convent, aber vor Allem White Rose Transmission, wo ich in beide Bands für den Gesang zuständig war und ich mochte 12 Drummers Drumming, wo Peter Gitarre spielte. Da lag es ziemlich nah mal etwas zusammen zu machen. Vier Wochen später hatten wir 12 neue Songstrukturen auf Tape und 4 Songs im Studio aufgenommen. Als später Ralf Aussem dazukam (Sun & Twelve DD) waren wir das perfekte trio. Wir hatten anfangs Startschwierigkeiten mit Schlagzeug und Bass und haben dann entschieden das wir 3 den Kern der Band bilden und für Live Touren eine Rhytmusgruppe dazuholen.
PETER:
Ja, ich kann mich gut erinnern an das erste Treffen mit Carlo. Es war nach ein Paar Bier in einer Bar in St. Pauli wo wir beschlossen haben miteinender Songs zu schreiben. Es hat sofort zwischen uns gefunkt. Ich hatte im Laufe der Zeit einige Instrumental Ideen auf der Gitarre entwickelt und Carlo besitzt einfach die geniale Gabe mit seinen Texten + spontanen Melodien die Songs zu komplettieren.

Für euer Album „Airplanes“ habt ihr euch lange Zeit genommen – fünf Jahre immerhin. Das erscheint äußerst ungewöhnlich bei der heutigen Schnelllebigkeit.
CARLO:
Ja, das stimmt schon, es war eine lange Entwicklungsphase, diesmal hatten wir jedoch nicht den Druck, da es noch keine Plattenfirma gab. Es sollte unser Debut werden, kein zusammengeschnitzeltes Werk, sondern eine CD mit einer großen Dichte; wir wollten zusammen ein Gefühl entwickeln ohne Deadlines. Wir hatten kein Label, keine Pläne, aber viele Konzerte. Mit Echozone fanden wir ein Label, das mit der gleichen Leidenschaft seine Bands promotet, mit dem wir Musik machen. Mancher Wein braucht eben seine Zeit zum Reifen. J Wir hatten aber auch Material für 2 Alben erarbeitet.
PETER:
Zwischen Vertragsunterzeichnung mit dem Label und Erscheiningsdatum vergingen ca. 9 Monate, also lief das schon recht schnell. Davor hatten wir halt in veschiedenen Phasen und diversen Studios die Songs eingespielt.

Carlos poetische Texte, die gelungenen Kompositionen, dazu Ralfs Effektgitarren und Loops, inspiriert ihr euch gegenseitig sehr?
CARLO:
Danke für das Kompliment! Ja wir inspirieren uns absolut gegenseitig, weil wir ja auch alle an einem Strang ziehen. Wir verstehen uns blind. Ralf und Peter haben mir noch nicht eine Nummer vorgespielt die mir absolut nicht gefallen hat. Beide wissen worüber ich schreibe und untermalen dieses mit ihren Sounds und Melodien. Es ist eine Verschmelzung der Gedanken und Ideen. Es ist wirklich erstaunlich wie alles zusammenpasst. Ich bekomme fast immer eine Gänsehaut wenn die Beiden loslegen und singe dann meine Gesangsmelodien über den Gitarrenteppich.
PETER:
Das kann ich nur bestätigen. Viele Songs entstehen aber einfach so beim „Improvisieren“. Einer fängt an, der nächste steigt ein und Carlo singt dazu und innerhalb kürzeste Zeit ist ein Song geboren, ich meine innerhalb vom Minuten steht das Gerüst. Details kommen dann später. Es ist im Leben sehr selten einen Sangesbruder wie Carlo zu erleben der auf alles was von den Gitarren angeflogen kommt eine „Hook Line“ singen kann, und das auch noch mit fertigen Text.
Es hilft natürlich auch dass wir auch noch miteinander befreundet sind.
Das gegenseitige Vertrauen zueinander verschafft uns den Auftrieb in unzähligen Ebenen völlig befreit zu agieren, und somit unsere Kreativitätsquellen immer erneut anzapfen zu können.

Die ersten Stationen eurer aktuellen Tour habt ihr hinter euch gebracht? Euer Eindruck?
CARLO:
Unser Eindruck war überwältigend! Obwohl wir eine „neue“ Band sind kamen durchschnittlich viele Leute zu den Konzerten. Die Resonanz und die Kritiken waren absolut klasse. Ich glaube das wir in kurze Zeit viele Fans dazu gewonnen haben. Wir sind nie ohne Zugaben von der Bühne gegangen.
PETER:
Ja, das live Auftreten ist immer wieder ein besonderes Erlebnis. Dank unserer hervorragenden Rythmusgruppe mit Patrick Schmitz-Drums und Sven Olaf Dirks am Bass, schafften wir es stehts ein dynamisch,- und spannungsreichen Set abzuliefern.
Ich glaube unterm Strich dass es deshalb diese Band gibt. Was würden wir sonst tun wenn wir nicht auf der Bühne den direkten Kontakt zu den Konzertgängern erleben dürften ? Live, Live und immer wieder Live. Dafür machen wir das Ganze.

Wie geht es weiter? Habt ihr Pläne für einen Airplanes-Nachfolger?
CARLO:
Wir werden weiter arbeiten wie bislang. Wir werden uns die Zeit nehmen die Musik so zu kreieren wie wir es bisher getan haben. Gute Songs entwickeln sich. Live haben wir 2 neue Songs eingebaut und die Leute haben begeistert darauf reagiert. Wir haben noch einige Songs fertig und arbeiten zur Zeit an neues Material. Wir werden sehen wo das nächste Flugzeug landet und hoffen nicht das es eine Bauchlandung gibt J
PETER:
Ja, die Zeit nehmen wir uns. Jedoch, das zweite Album wird sicherlich nicht so lange auf sich warten lassen wie „Airplanes“, da wir (wie Carlo schon sagt) schon einige songs dafür in der Pipeline haben, und diesmal möchten wir das komplette Album möglichst in einem „Rutsch“ aufnehmen, wie Quincy Jones mal sagte: „Geh ins Studio, nimm das Zeug auf und geh wieder nach Hause“